Wednesday, June 30, 2010

Goblin Valley State Park, Utah

The unusual stone shapes in Goblin Valley result from the weathering of Entrada Sandstone. They consist of debris eroded from former highlands and redeposited on a former tidal flat of alternating layers of sandstone, siltstone and shale. The rocks show evidence of being near an ancient sea with 1) the ebb and flow of tides, 2) tidal channels that directed currents back to the sea and 3) coastal sand dunes.
Joint or fracture patterns within the Entrada's sandstone beds created initial zones of weakness. The unweathered joints intersected to form sharp edges and corners with greater surface-area-to-volume ratios than the faces. As a result, the edges weathered more quickly, producing the spherical-shaped 'goblins'.

Here's our campsite, right in the Hoodoo's and Goblin's.


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Monday, June 28, 2010

Arches National Park, Utah

The national park lies atop an underground evaporite layer or salt bed, which is the main cause of the formation of the arches, spires, balanced rocks, sandstone fins, and eroded monoliths in the area. This salt bed is thousands of feet thick in places, and was deposited in the Paradox Basin of the Colorado Plateau some 300 million years ago when a sea flowed into the region and eventually evaporated. Over millions of years, the salt bed was covered with debris eroded from the Uncompahgre Uplift to the northeast.


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Moab & Arches National Park
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Sunday, June 27, 2010

Moab, Utah

We’ve got a second home now! We’re using our tent to get to some of the cooler places in Utah. It’s hard to take the trailer into some areas here. Check out this cool site on the Colorado River, between Moab and Arches National Park!


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Saturday, June 26, 2010

Work Kamping at KOA, Utah

You might have noticed by the blog we seem to have been doing a lot everyday now? We started our summer job at the KOA in Richfield Utah and have had time and internet to get the blog updated. We’ve started taking weekly trips to see all that Utah has to offer. To make it easier we got a nice Eureka Sunrise tent so we can get into any place we want.
If you're passing through, stop by and see us!
Here’s a look at our new summer home….


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Richfield KOA
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Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Capitol Reef National Park, Utah

We found a cool water fall on one of our hikes, too bad it wasn’t warm enough to play in it!


video

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Monday, June 21, 2010

Capitol Reef National Park (Fruita School House and Canyons), Utah

Capitol Reef encompasses the Waterpocket Fold, a warp in the earth's crust that is 65 million years old. In this fold, newer and older layers of earth folded over each other in an S-shape. This warp, probably caused by the same colliding continental plates that created the Rocky Mountains, has weathered and eroded over millennia to expose layers of rock and fossils. The park is filled with brilliantly colored sandstone cliffs, gleaming white domes, and contrasting layers of stone and earth.

Fruita is the best-known settlement in Capitol Reef National Park. It is located at the confluence of Fremont River and Sulphur Creek. Today few buildings remain, except for the restored Fruita schoolhouse and the Gifford house, barn and orchards.


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Capitol Reef National Park
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